February 17, 2010

God in Three Persons MATTHEW 28:18-20

Years ago, after I preached about God’s Spirit, a woman came up to complain, “Why do you talk about the Holy Spirit when people need to hear about Jesus and God?” Sometimes even those who have been Christians for a long time regard the Trinity as a hierarchy. To their way of thinking, the Father is God, Jesus is slightly beneath Him in rank and seniority, and the Holy Spirit is their servant. While this may conform to human models of authority, it is not biblical.

According to the Scriptures, all three members of the Trinity are fully God:

– God the Father—Jesus Christ referred to His Father as God (John 6:27).

– God the Son—John 1:1 identifies Jesus as divine. While Christ never specifically called Himself “God,” His Father did apply the title to Him (Heb. 1:8). Furthermore, Jesus acknowledged having unlimited power—an attribute possessed only by the divine Creator (Matt. 28:18)—and also accepted worship (Matt. 14:33; John 9:38).

– God the Holy Spirit—After declaring that God raised Christ from the dead, the New Testament goes on to credit the Holy Spirit with the resurrection (Acts 4:10; Rom. 8:11). Jesus reinforced that idea when He commanded the disciples to baptize new believers in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

The Bible confirms that each member of the Trinity is equally God. The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit function as a unit—no one is more important or less essential than the others. All three are focused upon their plan for mankind: salvation, transformation, and glory for God.

February 16, 2010

The Truth About the Trinity JOHN 14:26-27

The word “Trinity” cannot be found in the Bible, but the truth of it can. While there’s only one God, the Godhead consists of three distinct persons—the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. All are equally omniscient, omnipotent, omnipresent, eternal, and unchanging, but each one has unique functions.

Scripture shows how each member of the Trinity fulfills His specific role, and it also reveals how those three roles interrelate. Let me express this idea in simple terms: The Father creates a plan, Jesus Christ implements the plan, and the Holy Spirit administers the plan.

The way of redemption showcases these roles in a clear manner. The Father designed and organized how mankind would be redeemed (Gal. 4:4-5). He set into motion a complex set of events, actions, and prophecies which culminated in the life and death of a Savior. The Son carried out the plan (John 6:37-38). He followed the Father’s instructions to come to earth, even though that meant He would have to die. The Holy Spirit sees to it that every person feels a call toward God’s saving grace (John 14:26; 16:8; Romans 1:19-20). Furthermore, He transforms the lives and hearts of those who receive salvation through Jesus Christ.

The Father, Son, and Spirit are equal in their divine attributes. Yet each relates to mankind in a different way because He has a specific role. It’s very important to understand this distinction: We do not have three gods; we have one God in three persons functioning uniquely and perfectly.

February 15, 2010

The Enemy of Love: Bitterness LUKE 15:25-32

The story of the prodigal son gives us a wonderful illustration of God’s love. Jesus told the Pharisees this parable to reveal how the Father cares for human beings and delights when an errant child returns home. However, the Pharisees were lovers of law, order, and the appearance of righteousness. They probably identified more with the angry sibling than with the prodigal or the father.

The older son had already allowed bitterness to take root as a result of his younger brother’s departure. Even so, he was apparently proud of his appearance as the “good son,” just as the Pharisees would have been (Matt. 23:27). Often forgotten in this story is the fact that there was an inheritance for the older brother too—the land he was working and the animals he tended would all one day be his. In other words, he lost nothing when the wanderer returned.

Yet the brother was eaten up with anger. Instead of rejoicing over the prodigal’s return, he complained about the celebration (vv. 29-30). Jesus’ unspoken question to the Pharisees was this: Which son is it better to be like—the one who repented of wasting his inheritance or the one who served the father but showed no love to his contrite brother?

Human nature often desires recognition for doing right and yet begrudges a celebration for someone else. However, the believer has taken on Christ’s nature. Through His Spirit, we can love those who need it most and rejoice with them in their triumph, even when our own victories go unnoticed.

February 13, 2010

The Power of Love LUKE 15:11-24

At times, those of us reading Scripture in English are short-changed by the language’s limitations. For instance, English has just one word for love, whereas Paul’s original letters, written in Greek, use two words. Believers are promised that God’s love will reside in them (Eph. 3:19). But they often think that refers to a brotherly concern and affection for others (phileo). In fact, the Holy Spirit shows agape love in us—a commitment to another person’s satisfaction, security, and development. We have the same capacity for sacrificial love that Jesus showed at Calvary.

Jesus subtly described the power of sacrificial love in His parable of the prodigal son. The father must have recognized that greed and wanderlust were gnawing at the young man—and that denying his request for an early inheritance would lead to bitterness. So, despite personal and financial sacrifice, he gave the son his share. Then, the father waited patiently while the prodigal learned his lesson.

No doubt that was a trying time—a good dad wants to protect his children from making mistakes! But a wise man also knows that people often must discover hard truths for themselves. Sometimes the most loving thing we can do is to get out of their way.

The prodigal son returned home dirty, contrite, and seeking a place in the servants’ quarters. What he received instead was the full force of his father’s love and instant restoration to his place as the master’s son. That is agape, and it is the kind of love that wins hearts and minds for the Lord.

February 12, 2010

Decision Making God’s Way PSALM 119:103-105

Have you ever chosen a certain path, only to find yourself regretting that decision later? Life consists of a series of choices, some as small as what to eat for dinner, and others with eternal impact.

Facing these crossroads can seem overwhelming, but Scripture offers guidelines to give us confidence and direction. Therefore, as decisions are imminent, we should keep the following in mind:

First, God promises wisdom to His children who ask with faith (James 1:5-6). His Spirit also resides within believers and is available for guidance. Too many Christians try to weigh the pros and cons themselves, and they miss out on the magnificent help from the all-knowing One.

Second, we should delve into the Bible, asking God to open our eyes to His truth and His way. The Lord promises that His Word never returns void (Isa. 55:11). And if we memorize and meditate on Scripture, He will bring the truth to our minds at the appropriate time.

Third, we are wise to be aware of our mental state as we approach decisions. The acronym “H.A.L.T.” stands for hungry, angry, lonely, and tired—four states in which we will likely make poor choices. It is well worth waiting until a better time when considering options.

Our choices determine our direction, so consider carefully how you make decisions. Scripture is clear that we see dimly (1 Cor. 13:12); God alone sees the “whole picture.” It is vital, therefore, to rely upon His wisdom, truth, and direction every time we select an option before us.

February 11, 2010

Spiritual Shortsightedness GENESIS 25:19-24

Do you ever feel as though you are missing out on God’s rich blessings? Certainly hardship is a part of life, and we can’t have everything we ask to receive. But if we act foolishly, we might also miss out on some of the good things the Lord has in mind to give us.

That is exactly what happened with Esau in today’s passage. He was famished when he returned from a hunting trip. His brother Jacob offered a bowl of soup in exchange for Esau’s birthright. And the trade was accepted.

Doesn’t it seem foolish that this older brother would make such a swap? Yet we, too, can give up what is excellent for temporary satisfaction, if we’re not careful—that is, if we are spiritually shortsighted.

A person acting in this way exhibits certain characteristics. For one thing, he makes decisions based on today, without considering tomorrow’s consequences. Next, he is blind to life’s essential values, giving higher priority to his appetites and emotions than to the Lord. In addition, he’s willing to sacrifice what is lasting for something that brings only fleeting satisfaction. Similarly, he focuses on things that are temporal and not eternal. Finally, he makes decisions in times of physical, emotional, or spiritual weakness.

At the time, it may seem desirable to base a decision upon an immediate want. But are you willing to pay the price for that kind of shortsightedness? It will never satisfy your heart. Instead, rely on God’s Word for truth, and let His Spirit guide you in making every choice.

February 10, 2010

The Victory of Obedience JUDGES 7:9-25

God providentially orchestrated each element of His plan for Israel’s success. However, if Gideon had disobeyed even one divine command, his army would have suffered instant defeat. Although the Lord’s ways may seem risky or illogical, we can always trust His indisputable wisdom and rely on His mighty power.

God encourages the fainthearted. When the Lord commanded Gideon to attack the enemy, He also provided a way to relieve the leader’s fears. By following God’s directions, Gideon was led to the exact location where he would hear an encouraging message that caused him to bow in worship and arise with great faith.

God removes the things we depend on. Gideon was marching to war with only 300 men armed with trumpets, pitchers, and torches. Their manpower seemed pitiful, and their weapons useless for battle. With traditional means of victory removed, they could rely only upon the Lord.

God works in the other camp on our behalf. Everything is perfectly timed when God is in control—even the parts we cannot see. While Gideon was obeying each divine command, the Lord was working behind the scenes in the enemy camp to ensure victory for Israel. In the confusion and fear of darkness, their panic led to self-destruction.

The key to a victorious Christian life is obedience. The Lord will faithfully supply you with instructions for each step as you follow Him. His way may not be the easiest or the most comfortable, but it is always the best. As you rely on Him, He will lead you to victory.

February 9, 2010

When the Odds Are Against You JUDGES 7:1-8

The story of Gideon offers scriptural guidance for times when the odds are overwhelming and defeat seems imminent. No matter what your challenges are, the Lord is able to demonstrate His awesome power and deliver you.

God uses difficulty to build faith. Gideon was willing to believe God and go up against an army four times larger than his own. Trusting the Lord is a process which must be learned through experience. At times God takes the people He uses and places them in impossible situations—in that way, they discover that He is faithful. We may prefer to acquire faith by reading a book, but the Lord knows that the best classroom is a place of utter helplessness.

God may require us to do what seems unreasonable. The Israelites were already outnumbered, but the Lord instructed Gideon to reduce the army to a mere 300 men. That made the odds 450 to one! Although God’s ways may seem illogical to us, His wisdom and power are far greater than ours, and His plan can be trusted.

God leads us to do that which brings Him glory. The army was now so small that its men could in no way take credit for the victory. The Lord delights in demonstrating His awesome power and glory through our weakness and inadequacy,

Consider life’s challenges as opportunities for the Lord to build your faith and prepare you for ministry. He uses those who are willing to obey Him even when the task seems illogical or impossible. And He takes pleasure in showing His faithfulness to those who trust in Him regardless of the situation.

February 8, 2010

Let Go, and Grow Up HEBREWS 5:11-14

Yesterday we learned about the three levels of life. Today our focus will be on the fleshly man. Sadly, many Christians are stuck on this plane of existence. They try to obey the Lord, but the old “flesh” keeps emerging. Life is a roller coaster of spiritual ups and downs.

Sometimes this condition is due to ignorance. There are many people who fail to realize that 1) this lifestyle is not meant to be the norm for believers, and 2) the Lord has given us everything we need to live a godly life (2 Peter 1:3-4).

However, the primary reason believers live fleshly lives is because they have not yet made up their minds who will be in control. There is something they are unwilling to surrender to God—it could be a desire, habit, or source of security or pleasure. Another possibility is that they have sensed His call on their lives but are running from Him in fear or rebellion.

The consequences of living this way are devastating. Without the Spirit’s governing control, the carnal Christian is spiritually immature and ruled by his own desires, rights, and expectations. Because he has not applied previously learned biblical truths (milk), he cannot understand the deeper things of Scripture (meat). The result is stunted spiritual growth.

If you find yourself described here, take courage. You do not have to remain in this condition. What are you holding onto? Letting go can be very difficult, but the power of almighty God resides within you through His Spirit. Relax your grip, surrender to Him, and rely on His strength.

February 7th 2010 Warrior update

Sunday Night Bible Study for the Revelation Round Table Warriors

Another Good Lesson Tonight – Sorry that it was brief and I will print out the Charts for next time.

As a Reminder for Home work – Read thru Rev 13 and 17 together to understand better, follow up with Daniel 2, 7 and 8 for info on the beast and EU

Don’t forget to think about the Mark of the Beast and also look at a Barcode…

Remember our Pledge – Remain Faithful, the Truth will set you free and Be Strong.

John 8:31 -32  Jesus said to the people who believed in him, “You are truly my disciples if you remain faithful to my teachings. And you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.”

1st Cor 16:13 Be on guard. Stand firm in the faith. Be courageous. Be strong.

And Our Quest – To search out the Truth about the End Times.

Also on the Last Note – Support Our Pastor – AMEN!

February 6, 2010

The Levels of Life 1 CORINTHIANS 2:12-3:3

Living accommodations vary widely in the physical world, ranging from mansions to crude shelters. In the same way, the spiritual realm also has different levels.

In our passage today, the Lord reveals three ranks of spiritual life:

1. The Natural Man—Everyone who has not accepted Christ as his Savior is in this category. Many in this group are capable of good deeds, but since their sins remain unforgiven, they are separated from the Lord. Because the Holy Spirit does not dwell within them, they cannot understand the things of God.

2. The Spiritual Man—This group is composed of Christians who are filled with the Spirit and surrendered to His control. Though they’re not perfect, they are quick to recognize transgression, confess sin, and genuinely repent by turning back to God. Because the Holy Spirit is ruling in their lives, He is able to guide them by offering wisdom and insight into spiritual things.

3. The Fleshly Man—This designation describes believers who are trying to live in two different worlds. At salvation, all Christians are given a new nature, but the old “flesh” patterns aren’t removed. By allowing residual sinful tendencies to dominate their lives, these people are quenching the Spirit within them.

You are in one of these three categories. Take some time to evaluate your life by asking, Where am I now? Where would I like to be? The Lord will help those who want to move closer to Him. Ask Him to work in your life to bring you to the place of the spiritual man.

February 5, 2010

Developing a Tender Heart EZEKIEL 36:25-28

The Lord wants to give each of us a “heart of flesh” so that we will be pliable and responsive to Him. When touched by the finger of God, a tender heart yields to the pressure and assumes the form He desires, much like a lump of clay that allows the potter to determine the shape of the vessel.

To aid in this process, God has sent the Holy Spirit to indwell each believer and awaken responsiveness in him or her. By yielding to the Spirit’s promptings with ready obedience, the heart becomes increasingly tender and sensitive to His leading. The Lord is able to impart greater understanding of His Word to a soft heart because it has faithfully accepted and obeyed previous teachings.

Any resistance to God will result in hardening. But those who are accustomed to intimacy with Christ—which is the result of submission to Him—will be quick to deal with sin and return to the place of obedience and blessing.

People with tender hearts stay closely connected to the body of Christ, seeking to build up and encourage others in their walk of faith. Such individuals are not only receptive to what God wants to tell them; they are also teachable, in that they are willing to listen and be corrected by others.

This week when you read your Bible and pray, let your heart be soft toward the words of God. As He pokes His finger into each hard area, listen to His instructions, and rely on the Spirit’s power to help you yield and obey. Let Him shape you into a beautiful and useful vessel.

February 4, 2010

The Danger of a Hardening Heart HEBREWS 3:7-19

God repeatedly calls to His children, but the condition of each heart determines the result. Those with soft and tender hearts hear His voice and yield to Him in obedience, but those with hard hearts resist His warnings and instructions. Surprisingly, upon hearing the same voice, some believers are motivated to a deeper and more obedient relationship with the Lord, while others reject and refuse Him.

Since hardening is a slow process that’s often accompanied by rationalizations and excuses, the danger signs may not be readily recognized. How do you respond when the Lord speaks to you through His Word, your conscience, or messages based on Scripture? Carefully consider the following characteristics of a hardening heart:

– Insensitivity or resistance to what God says
– Refusal to put yourself under His authority
– Disobedience to what you know the Lord is instructing you to do
– Justification of sinful conduct
– Resistance to the reproof of others
– Preoccupation with the things of this world (career, relationships, possessions)
– Little interest in spiritual matters
– Absence of private devotion (Bible reading and prayer)
– Avoidance of public worship (gathering with other believers)

A hard heart does not have to stay in that condition. If you have discovered any of the above traits in your life, begin today to return to the Lord. Ask Him to give you a new heart to know Him (Jer. 24:7). Remember, He specializes in making all things new (2 Cor. 5:17).

February 3, 2010

Why Good Works Aren’t Enough ROMANS 3:10-12

Some people believe that good works are like a “get out of hell free” card. What these folks do not realize is that an individual isn’t condemned by the Lord because of the things he does. He is condemned because of what he is—a person with a spirit bent away from God. We choose to sin because it is our nature to do so.

To find proof that mankind does not naturally obey, all one has to do is observe any two-year-old child. Why does a toddler tug on the lamp cord after his mom says, “Don’t touch!”? His impulse to do what he wants is greater than his desire to please Mother.

Complying with authority is a choice that we learn to make. In the meantime, we all have a rebellious nature. Not one single person is good enough or wise enough to remain sinless and pleasing before the Lord. Therefore, we have all sinned and are under a death sentence (Rom. 3:23; 6:23).

The Word of God says that until the moment of salvation, we are dead in our trespasses and sins (Eph. 2:1). This means that although the body has not yet undergone physical death, the spirit is lifeless apart from the Lord. We are helpless to save ourselves.

We are a people in need of rescue. The instant we receive the Lord Jesus Christ as Savior, our spirit is brought to life and our heart undergoes transformation. In the moment that God saves you, He makes you into a new creature—one with a nature surrendered to Him and His will.

February 2, 2010

The Cost of Our Salvation PHILIPPIANS 2:5-8

In our world of electronic banking and charge cards, it’s easy to ignore what things cost. The same is true with sin. Our culture enjoys temporary pleasures while disregarding what God says is the price of transgression (Rom. 6:23a).

The Bible tells us what it cost Jesus to pay for our sin. For our sake, He suffered . . .

Physical pain. In the hours leading to His crucifixion, Jesus was mocked, beaten, and humiliated. In His weakened state, He was forced to carry the instrument of His death—the cross. Then He was nailed to it and hoisted up to die an excruciating death.

Man’s sin. Jesus lived a perfect life on earth and never knew the disgrace of sin or the bitterness of regret. But at the cross, the Father placed all of mankind’s sins upon the Savior (2 Cor. 5:21). There, Christ experienced the fullness of our transgressions, guilt, and shame.

Abandonment. In the final hours, Jesus was separated from His Father (Mark 15:34), their fellowship broken for the only time since eternity past. Our sin became the barrier that kept them apart until Christ’s work of atonement was finished (John 19:30).

Divine judgment. God’s wrath was poured out upon our Lord because of man’s sin. Christ experienced the condemnation that we deserved.

Our Savior suffered greatly on our behalf. He gave His life so we might become part of God’s family (John 1:12). He calls us to a life of sacrificial service—doing the Father’s work and living to please Him. In light of what our salvation cost, how can we do anything less?

February 1, 2010

A Debt Paid in Full COLOSSIANS 2:13-14

Mankind has a debt problem. In the physical world, our desire for a higher standard of living and more “stuff” has led to burdensome credit card balances and unwieldy mortgage payments. The weight of what we owe can cause restless nights and the feeling that we’re trapped. We long for someone to rescue us from the mess we have made.

However, material indebtedness isn’t our biggest problem. Our sin-debt is. All of us were born with a “flesh” nature that prompts us to rebel against the Lord. Our rebelliousness is an affront to His holy nature, incurring a debt that we owe to Him. Until this penalty is paid, we are under God’s righteous judgment and remain spiritually separated from Him (Eph. 2:1-2). The trouble is, we are unable to pay what’s due. No amount of good works, self-sacrifice, or religious devotion will lessen what we owe.

So God, in His great mercy, sent His Son to rescue us. Jesus Christ left heaven and all of its glory so He could come to earth to live and die for us (Phil. 2:6-7). Although the cost to our Savior was enormous, He willingly paid the price we owed. He took our sins upon Himself, bore them to the cross, and discharged our debt in full. Hallelujah!

When we receive Jesus as our Savior, His atoning work is credited to our account. We become children of God and co-heirs with Christ—we’re changed from debtors to inheritors (1 Peter 1:3-4). Let the knowledge of His sacrifice on the cross permeate your thinking, attitude, and choices.

January 30, 2010

A Lesson in Pruning JOHN 15:1-4

Years ago I lived in Fruitland, North Carolina. It was apple country, and several of my parishioners were growers. When I stopped by to visit one of them, his wife told me that he was in the orchard. So I walked out back to find him mercilessly cutting branches from one of the trees. Without thinking, I said, “You’re going to kill that tree!” He turned around and said, “You stick to preaching, and leave the pruning to me.”

This gentleman and I became friends, and it was from him that I learned about the pruning process. In order to produce an abundant crop of the best fruit, he had to cut as he did. It might look as if the tree was going to die, but new growth would spring from the wounds. Our conversations helped me to understand why the Lord sometimes acts as a pruning force in people’s lives.

To get a plentiful crop of spiritual fruit, our heavenly Father must remove anything that distracts or deters us from serving Him. The process is often painful. I know I’ve cried out, “More, Lord?” when He has taken the “knife” to me. But the result is always satisfying—I am a better, more accurate reflection of Jesus Christ after God cuts away a fleshly habit or worldly attitude.

Being loved by God does not mean we will be coddled—our comfort is not His primary interest. A grower must prune an apple tree to get a bountiful harvest. In the same way, God must sometimes let us feel pain so He can bring forth greater growth and more spiritual fruit.

January 29, 2010

Look to Jesus and Live JOHN 3:7-15

Jesus’ conversation with Nicodemus was packed with symbolism. He compared salvation to a second birth and likened the Holy Spirit’s work to the wind. But then the Lord used an Old Testament illustration that might seem odd to modern readers—He said the Son of Man must be lifted up, just as Moses lifted the bronze serpent (Num. 21:1-9).

Nicodemus would have been familiar with the story: En route to the Promised Land, the Israelites once complained about going the long way around enemy territory. God responded by sending poisonous snakes into their midst. A bite victim would die unless he or she looked at the bronze serpent hanging from a pole in the camp. The statue was a symbolic representation of God’s presence among the Israelites as well as a reminder that He was their deliverer.

While we might not mix spiritual birth and a snake on a pole in one testimony, Jesus did so for a good reason. These metaphors describe related events. The Messiah was explaining that He must be lifted onto the cross as a sacrifice for all of mankind’s wrongs. A new birth is impossible unless somebody pays the price for our sinful condition. Those who look to Jesus and believe will be forgiven, saved, and born again.

Jesus’ message to Nicodemus becomes clear when we understand how the pieces fit together. The Savior is saying that He must die on the cross so that sinful human beings can be born again. Have you looked to Jesus Christ for salvation? He is the only way to new life.

January 28, 2010

Religious But Lost JOHN 3:1-6

Nicodemus would probably be welcome at any church today. He seems an ideal member—principled, knowledgeable, morally upstanding, courteous, and humble. However, Nicodemus had two big problems despite all of that outward religious appeal. He was blind to the truth and spiritually dead.

The man was lost. That is, he did not have a relationship with God through Jesus Christ. As a Pharisee, Nicodemus adhered to strict Jewish codes and laws, so he was certainly religious. But the problem of the lost person is not attitudes, conduct, or even character. We can change and control those through sheer determination, and many folks do. What people really need is a change of condition. We come into this world with a sinful nature that is bent away from God.

Jesus explained to the observant rabbi that all his outward goodness couldn’t erase, replace, or change his nature. Instead, every person who desires to serve God must be born again. The Lord promised that if Nicodemus received Him as Savior, then he would enter into a brand-new life. His old sinful nature would be transformed so that he could have a real relationship with God. Instead of appearing to be a religious man, Nicodemus would be a true believer.

No one gets into heaven on the strength of good works and kind behavior. When we stand before God, only our condition will matter. In place of our old, dead “flesh” nature, we want to show Him the living spirit we received when Jesus Christ came into our life.

January 27, 2010

Crying Out to God 2 CHRONICLES 20:1-25

When God’s people humbly call upon His name, He releases awesome power. The Bible is packed with stories of His mighty intervention on behalf of those who cry out to Him.

Take Jehoshaphat, for instance. Today’s passage tells of the king’s faithfulness and reliance upon the Lord in a time of adversity: he received word that the Moabites, Ammonites, and Meunites were joining forces to wage war against his kingdom.

Jehoshaphat admitted his fear but quickly reminded himself of God’s faithfulness to other believers in the past (v. 7). Confessing total dependence on the Lord, he gathered all of the Israelites to cry out to their Father. Through the prophet Jahaziel, God reminded them this was His battle, so they were not to fear (vv. 14-15). The people praised the Lord for His encouragement. And, amazingly, when they “came to the lookout of the wilderness, they looked toward the multitude, and . . . no one had escaped” (v. 24). All their enemies lay dead.

God worked in a more miraculous way than anyone could imagine—and He still exceeds our expectations today. Through such means as prayer, praise, song, and fasting, we can ask Him to reveal Himself. He is ready to respond when we bring heavy hearts and deep concerns to Him.

Crying out to God and asking Him to work in our lives requires humility and persistence. Though we are unable to succeed on our own, we frequently try. By allowing us to bring our concerns and desires before Him, Jesus lovingly helps us realize our dependence.

Scriptures, Lessons, News and Links to help you survive.