Charles Stanley –Good Stewards

 

1 Peter 4:7-11

If you have been in the church for any length of time, you’ve probably heard that it’s wise to be accountable to another Christian. Finding a reliable and spiritually mature believer to take on this role is one means of protecting ourselves from temptations that could easily entrap us. When we know we’re going to have to answer to someone for our choices, we are far less likely to yield to sinful desires.

But ultimately, there is an even greater motive for righteous living. Unlike a spouse or close friend who may be able to help us make right choices, our all-knowing God sees even more than our actions—He discerns our intentions as well. It may be possible for us to fool people, but we can never hide from the Lord.

Peter admonishes us to be good stewards of God’s grace (1 Peter 4:10). In the apostle’s day, a steward was a household manager—he himself didn’t own anything but was responsible for his master’s possessions and affairs.

In essence, that’s what the Christian life is like. Every possession, privilege, and duty we have has been given to us by God. And as stewards, we are accountable to the Lord for the way we serve Him, what we say, and how we treat one another. The goal is God’s glory—not our rights, comforts, or pleasures.

Relying on one another through accountability will help God’s children to live as His good stewards. Confiding in a trustworthy believer provides the motivation and encouragement to live in a way that honors our Lord and Savior.

Bible in One Year: Leviticus 11-13

 

http://www.intouch.org/

Our Daily Bread — Restored

 

Bible in a Year:Exodus 29–30; Matthew 21:23–46

I will repay you for the years the locusts have eaten.

Joel 2:25

Today’s Scripture & Insight:Joel 2:18-27

A 2003 infestation of Mormon crickets caused more than $25 million in lost crops. The crickets came in such numbers that people couldn’t so much as take a step without finding one underfoot. The grasshopper-like insect, named for attacking the crops of the Utah pioneers in 1848, can eat an astounding thirty-eight pounds of plant material in their lifetimes, despite being merely two to three inches long. The impact of infestations on famers’ livelihoods—and the overall economy of a state or country—can be devastating.

The Old Testament prophet Joel described a horde of similar insects ravaging the entire nation of Judah as a consequence for their collective disobedience. He foretold an invasion of locusts (a metaphor for a foreign army, in the minds of some Bible scholars) like nothing previous generations had seen (Joel 1:2). The locusts would lay waste to everything in their path, driving the people into famine and poverty. If, however, the people would turn from their sinful ways and ask God for forgiveness, Joel says the Lord would “repay [them] for the years the locusts have eaten” (2:25).

We too can learn from Judah’s lesson: like insects, our wrongdoings eat away at the fruitful, fragrant life God intended for us. When we turn toward Him, and away from our past choices, He promises to remove our shame and restore us to an abundant life in Him.

By Kirsten Holmberg

Today’s Reflection

What can you ask God’s forgiveness for today?

To learn more about Joel and other Old Testament prophets, see the free course at christianuniversity.org/OT128.

 

http://www.odb.org

Joyce Meyer – Gods Timing

 

Adapted from the resource My Time with God Devotional – by Joyce Meyer

God’s timing in our lives is perfect, and we will enjoy life much more if we believe that. He knows the exact right time to do the things we have requested of Him.

Don’t waste your time being upset about something that only God can change. If He withholds your desire for the time being, thank Him that He knows best.

Time is a gift—don’t waste it being upset!

Prayer Starter: Father, I know that Your timing is perfect. Help me to patiently wait on You and learn to enjoy each and every moment of my life, knowing that You are in complete control. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

 

 

http://www.joycemeyer.org

Campus Crusade for Christ; Bill Bright – Using Our Abilities

 

“Why is it that He gives us these special abilities to do certain things best? It is that God’s people will be equipped to do better work for Him, building up the church, the body of Christ, to a position of strength and maturity; until finally we all believe alike about our salvation and about our Savior, God’s Son, and all become full-grown in the Lord – yes, to the point of being filled full with Christ” (Ephesians 4:12,13).

We would be poor stewards if we ignored the special abilities the Holy Spirit has given to us.

We must use our abilities to glorify Christ, not to glorify ourselves, or some other person, or even to glorify the gift itself.

Peter says, “Are you called to preach? Then preach as though God Himself were speaking through you” (1 Peter 4:11). Do you possess musical ability? Share it with the rest of Christ’s family. Peter goes on, “Are you called to help others? Do it with all the strength and energy that God supplies, so that God will be glorified through Jesus Christ – to Him be glory and praise forever and ever.”

We have the obligation to use our God-given abilities in a scriptural manner to help equip others for Christian service. The apostle Paul writes that spiritual gifts are given “for the equipping of the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ” (Ephesians 4:12, NAS).

In order to live supernaturally, it is important for us always to exercise our abilities in the power and control of the Holy Spirit – never through our own fleshly efforts.

Bible Reading:Ephesians 4:11-16

TODAY’S ACTION POINT: My motivation for using my spiritual gift(s) and abilities will be solely to glorify Christ through helping to equip other members of His body to be more effective and fruitful for Him.

 

http://www.cru.org