Tag Archives: everlasting covenant

Alistair Begg – Re-Read the Promise

Alistair Begg

I will remember my covenant.   Genesis 9:15

Note the form of this promise. God does not say, “And when you shall look upon the bow, and you shall remember My covenant, then I will not destroy the earth,” but it is gloriously put, not upon our memory, which is fickle and frail, but upon God’s memory, which is infinite and immutable. “When . . . the bow is seen in the clouds, I will remember my covenant.” It is not my remembering God—it is God’s remembering me that is the ground of my safety; it is not my laying hold of His covenant, but His covenant’s laying hold on me. Glory be to God!

The ramparts of salvation are secured by divine power, and even the minor towers, which we could imagine being left to man, are guarded by almighty strength. Even the remembrance of the covenant is not left to our memories, for we might forget; but our Lord cannot forget the names of those whom He has graven on the palms of His hands. It is with us as it was with Israel in Egypt; the blood was upon the lintel and the two side-posts, but the Lord did not say, “When you see the blood I will pass over you,” but “When I see the blood I will pass over you.”

My looking to Jesus brings me joy and peace, but it is God’s looking to Jesus that secures my salvation and that of all His elect, since it is impossible for our God to look at Christ, our bleeding Surety, and then to be angry with us for sins already punished in Him. It is not left with us even to be saved by remembering the covenant. There is not a single thread of human effort in this fabric. It is not of man, neither by man, but of the Lord alone. We should remember the covenant, and we shall do it, through divine grace; but the hinge of our safety does not hang there—it is God’s remembering us, not our remembering Him; and hence the covenant is an everlasting covenant.

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The family reading plan for August 13, 2014 * Jeremiah 41 * Psalm 17

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Devotional material is taken from “Morning and Evening,” written by C.H. Spurgeon, revised and updated by Alistair Begg.

Alistair Begg – An Everlasting Covenant

Alistair Begg

For he has made with me an everlasting covenant.

2 Samuel 23:5

This covenant is divine in its origin. “He has made with me an everlasting covenant.” Oh, that great word “he”! My soul, consider-God, the everlasting Father, has positively made a covenant with you; yes, the God who spoke the world into existence by a word; He, stooping from His majesty, takes hold of your hand and makes a covenant with you. Isn’t this act so stupendous and such an example of condescension that it would overwhelm us forever if we could really understand it? “He has made with me an everlasting covenant.”

A king has not made a covenant with me-that would be something; but the Prince of the kings of the earth, Shaddai, the Lord All-sufficient, the Jehovah of ages, the everlasting Elohim-“He has made with me an everlasting covenant.”

But notice, it is particular in its application. “For he has made with me an everlasting covenant.” Here is the sweetness of it to each believer. It is nothing for me that He made peace for the world; I want to know whether He made peace for me! It is a small matter that He has made a covenant; I want to know whether He has made a covenant with me.

Blessed is the assurance that He has made a covenant with me! If God the Holy Spirit gives me assurance of this, then His salvation is mine, His heart is mine, He Himself is mine-He is my God.

This covenant is everlasting in its duration. An everlasting covenant means a covenant that had no beginning and that will never, ever end. How sweet in all the uncertainties of life to know that “God’s foundation stands firm,”1 and to have God’s own promise, “I will not violate my covenant or alter the word that went forth from my lips.”2 I will sing of this through all my days and at their ending and forever.

1 2 Timothy 2:19 2 Psalm 89:34

 

Charles Spurgeon – The blood of the everlasting covenant

CharlesSpurgeon

“The blood of the everlasting covenant.” Hebrews 13:20

Suggested Further Reading: Hebrews 9:15-26

With regard to Christ, his precious blood shed in Gethsemane, in Gabbatha and Golgotha, is the fulfilment of the covenant. By this blood sin is cancelled; by Jesus’ agonies justice is satisfied; by his death the law is honoured; and by that precious blood in all its mediatorial efficacy, and in all its cleansing power, Christ fulfils all that he stipulated to do on behalf of his people towards God. Oh, believer, look to the blood of Christ, and remember that there is Christ’s part of the covenant carried out. And now, there remains nothing to be fulfilled but God’s part, there is nothing for thee to do; Jesus has done it all; there is nothing for free will to supply; Christ has done everything that God can demand. The blood is the fulfilment of the debtor’s side of the covenant, and now God becomes bound by his own solemn oath to show grace and mercy to all whom Christ has redeemed by his blood. With regard to the blood in another respect, it is to God the Father the bond of the covenant. When I see Christ dying on the cross, I see the everlasting God from that time, if I may use the term of him who ever must be free, bound by his own oath and covenant to carry out every stipulation. Does the covenant say, “A new heart will I give you, and a right spirit will I put within you?” It must be done, for Jesus died, and Jesus’ death is the seal of the covenant. Does it say, “I will sprinkle pure water upon you and you shall be clean; from all your iniquities will I cleanse you?” Then it must be done, for Christ has fulfilled his part.

For meditation: The very character of God doubles the reliability of his purposes and promises (Hebrews 6:13-18).

Sermon no. 277

2 October (1859)

 

Charles Spurgeon’s Morning and Evening

 

Morning  “Yet he hath made with me an everlasting covenant.” / 2 Samuel 23:5

This covenant is divine in its origin. “He hath made with me an everlasting

covenant.” Oh that great word He ! Stop, my soul. God, the everlasting Father,

has positively made a covenant with thee; yes, that God who spake the world

into existence by a word; he, stooping from his majesty, takes hold of thy

hand and makes a covenant with thee. Is it not a deed, the stupendous

condescension of which might ravish our hearts forever if we could really

understand it? “HE hath made with me a covenant.” A king has not made a

covenant with me–that were somewhat; but the Prince of the kings of the

earth, Shaddai, the Lord All-sufficient, the Jehovah of ages, the everlasting

Elohim, “He hath made with me an everlasting covenant.” But notice, it is

particular in its application. “Yet hath he made with me an everlasting

covenant.” Here lies the sweetness of it to each believer. It is nought for me

that he made peace for the world; I want to know whether he made peace for me!

It is little that he hath made a covenant, I want to know whether he has made

a covenant with me. Blessed is the assurance that he hath made a covenant with

me! If God the Holy Ghost gives me assurance of this, then his salvation is

mine, his heart is mine, he himself is mine–he is my God.

 

This covenant is everlasting in its duration. An everlasting covenant means a

covenant which had no beginning, and which shall never, never end. How sweet

amidst all the uncertainties of life, to know that “the foundation of the Lord

standeth sure,” and to have God’s own promise, “My covenant will I not break,

nor alter the thing that is gone out of my lips.” Like dying David, I will

sing of this, even though my house be not so with God as my heart desireth.

 

Evening  “I clothed thee also with broidered work, and shod thee with badgers’ skin,

and I girded thee about with fine linen, and I covered thee with silk.” /

Ezekiel 16:10

See with what matchless generosity the Lord provides for his people’s apparel.

They are so arrayed that the divine skill is seen producing an unrivalled

broidered work, in which every attribute takes its part and every divine

beauty is revealed. No art like the art displayed in our salvation, no cunning

workmanship like that beheld in the righteousness of the saints. Justification

has engrossed learned pens in all ages of the church, and will be the theme of

admiration in eternity. God has indeed “curiously wrought it.” With all this

elaboration there is mingled utility and durability, comparable to our being

shod with badgers’ skins. The animal here meant is unknown, but its skin

covered the tabernacle, and formed one of the finest and strongest leathers

known. The righteousness which is of God by faith endureth forever, and he who

is shod with this divine preparation will tread the desert safely, and may

even set his foot upon the lion and the adder. Purity and dignity of our holy

vesture are brought out in the fine linen. When the Lord sanctifies his

people, they are clad as priests in pure white; not the snow itself excels

them; they are in the eyes of men and angels fair to look upon, and even in

the Lord’s eyes they are without spot. Meanwhile the royal apparel is delicate

and rich as silk. No expense is spared, no beauty withheld, no daintiness

denied.

What, then? Is there no inference from this? Surely there is gratitude to be

felt and joy to be expressed. Come, my heart, refuse not thy evening

hallelujah! Tune thy pipes! Touch thy chords!

“Strangely, my soul, art thou arrayed

By the Great Sacred Three!

In sweetest harmony of praise

Let all thy powers agree.”