Tag Archives: Joseph

Greg Laurie – You Have His Attention

 

“The LORD lift up His countenance upon you, and give you peace.”—Numbers 6:26

Have you ever been talking with someone who wasn’t paying attention? Or to put it another way, have you ever been talking with someone who was texting? You’re saying, “And so I said this—are you listening to me?”

“Yes.”

“What did I just say?”

“Uh, I’m not sure.”

Sometimes we wonder if it’s the same way with God. We wonder whether we have His attention and if He is aware of what is happening to us when things aren’t going that well.

Maybe Joseph felt that way at times. After all, he was only human. He had done all of the right things. He had resisted the advances of Potiphar’s wife. But what happened? He was falsely accused of rape and thrown into a stinking Egyptian prison. How easily Joseph could have thought, This is just great. You serve the Lord, you do what God wants, and this is where it gets you. If I would have given in to Mrs. Potiphar, I wouldn’t be here right now. I would be living in the lap of luxury. But here I am, suffering!

The Bible doesn’t tell us that Joseph thought that, but I wonder if he did. Yet even while Joseph was in prison, God was still blessing him and preparing him for some awesome things. Joseph’s best days were to come. God was preparing him to be someone who could handle those lessons. In the same way, everything we go through in life is preparation for something else.

When Numbers 6:26 says, “The LORD lift up His countenance upon you,” that phrase “lift up His countenance” means “to lift up His face.” Another way to translate it is “to look, to see, to know, to be interested, and to have one’s full attention.”

We have His full attention.

Max Lucado – Looking Upward

Genesis tells us, When Joseph had come to his brothers, they stripped him of his tunic. They took him and cast him into a pit. . .and they sat down to eat a meal. (37:23-25)

Joseph’s hands were bound, his ankles tied, and his voice became hoarse from screaming. It wasn’t that his brothers didn’t hear him. Twenty-two years later, when a famine tamed their swagger, they would confess, “we saw the anguish of his soul when he pleaded with us, and we would not hear” (Gen 42:21).

You’re a version of Joseph. You carry something of God within you—something the world needs. If Satan can neutralize you, he can mute your influence. Life in the pit stinks! Yet it forces you to look upward. Someone from up there must come down here and give you a hand. God did for Joseph, and He will do the same for you!

From You’ll Get Through This

Greg Laurie – Sin’s Greatest Deterrent

 

“If you love Me, keep My commandments.”—John 14:15

What a terrible thing it is when believers fall into sexual sin. After David fell into sin with Bathsheba, the prophet Nathan said to him, “By this deed you have given great occasion to the enemies of the LORD to blaspheme” (2 Samuel 12:14). In other words, “David, you just gave ammunition to the enemy.”

I wish Christians would think about that before they sin. Joseph did. When Potiphar’s wife made her advances, Joseph understood there were consequences to sin. He said, “There is no one greater in this house than I, nor has [Potiphar] kept back anything from me but you, because you are his wife. How then can I do this great wickedness, and sin against God?” (Genesis 39:9). Joseph was loyal to Potiphar. Of course, Potiphar would end up betraying Joseph. But Joseph wouldn’t betray Potiphar.

Joseph could have rationalized it. Hey, man, I had a rough childhood. I was sold into slavery by my brothers. I am here all alone in Egypt. It’s hard being alone. Egyptian culture—that is the way it is here. It doesn’t really matter.

He could have said a lot of things, but Joseph understood that God’s standards are absolute. They don’t change. He also realized that all sin is against God. This should be our strongest deterrent against sin—not merely our fear of the repercussions. The greatest deterrent against sin is loving God. If you love God, you want to do things that honor Him.

I like this statement of Augustine’s: “Love God and do as you please.” If you really love God as you ought to, with all your heart, all your soul, and all your mind, then you will only want to do what pleases Him. Jesus said, “If you love Me, keep My commandments” (John 14:15).

Greg Laurie – Your Best for God’s Glory

 

The LORD was with Joseph, and he was a successful man; and he was in the house of his master the Egyptian. —Genesis 39:2

When it looked as though life was over for Joseph, in many ways it was just beginning. His brothers had sold him to slave traders, and as it turned out, those slave traders sold him to a very important person named Potiphar, who was the captain of the guard in Egypt. Potiphar was basically the head of the military police and part of the royal body guard. It was sort of like being the head of the Secret Service of that day. Also, as the chief of the executioners, Potiphar was responsible for the execution of all criminals. He was not a man to mess with.

Potiphar became the owner of Joseph and put him to work, and the Bible tells us that the Lord was with Joseph (see Genesis 39:2). God blessed Joseph because of his hard work, faithfulness, honesty, and integrity, and success followed him like a shadow.

It was almost as though Joseph had a Midas touch. He kept his priorities straight, and whatever Joseph did, he did so well that Potiphar eventually put him in charge of everything. Even Potiphar, who was clearly a nonbeliever, recognized that the Lord was with Joseph.

Joseph’s life serves as a reminder that Christians should be the hardest workers and do the best work. Colossians 3:23–24 tells us, “And whatever you do, do it heartily, as to the Lord and not to men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the reward of the inheritance; for you serve the Lord Christ.” Whatever you do, do it as though you were doing it for Christ Himself—not for the paycheck, not for the boss, and not even for the promotion.

Here is what I believe: if you will do your best work for God’s glory, He will bless you.

Ravi Zacharias Ministry –  Discordant Intersections

 

The dissonance that comes when personal experience and belief contradict is a painful discord. What do you do, for example, when you have believed that God heals, and yet you watch helplessly as a loved one dies of cancer? How do you affirm the goodness of humanity to a woman who was sexually abused as a young girl? How do you respond when you believe that hard work pays off, and yet you cannot square that formula with a series of professional and personal failures?

The fortress of beliefs we sometimes hold as impenetrable can come crashing down as life’s experiences crush us. In the aftermath, the alternative shelters of cynical doubt or blind faith beckon us to take refuge with them. For most of us, we run perilously between both extremes, without the sense of security that the fortress once provided.

The Bible is replete with stories about individuals who faced the difficult conflict between what they held as truth and what they experienced in their lives. Joseph was told by God through a sequence of dreams that he would one day be a great ruler and that even his family would bow down to him. He had been given a glimpse of his destiny, and he could have easily concluded that the road would soon lead him to the landscape God described. Instead, he was almost murdered by his brothers, sold into slavery, falsely accused by his master’s wife, and spent much of his life in jail. I highly doubt this was the path to glory Joseph imagined for himself.

Surely, Joseph believed in a God who watched over him and ruled the world with justice and mercy. But what was he to do with this demonstration of justice and sovereignty? Sitting in a jail cell falsely accused doesn’t align with our ideas about justice, nor does it seem to point to a merciful sovereign.

Yet despite the contradiction between his life experience and the dreams God had once given him, Joseph seemed to affirm his trust in God. He confirmed God as the provider of dreams and interpretations; he acknowledged God as the one who makes all things known. In every position Joseph found himself in, he found favor with God and prospered. Though in slavery, he was put in charge of Potiphar’s household. Though in prison, he was put in charge of the rest of the prisoners.

Even wrestling through belief and experience, contradiction and discord, God can give new perspective and a deeper understanding. Even in loss, God can alter our understanding of gain. In the words of Craig Barnes:

“The deep fear behind every loss is that we have been abandoned by the God who should have saved us. The transforming moment in Christian conversion comes when we realize that even God has left us. We then discover it was not God, but our image of God that abandoned us…. Only then is change possible.”

Sometimes it is through loss of vision that God restores sight. Indeed, Joseph later tells the very brothers who betrayed him, “It was not you who sent me here, but God.” Elsewhere he insists, “You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives.” Life doesn’t always go as planned, but the plans of God are sufficient. Joseph witnessed the sovereign hand of God, though probably not in the way he first imagined it. Perhaps we, too, need to look again at our discordant intersections of faith and experience. Often it is God Himself who stands at the crossroads.

Stuart McAllister is regional director for the Americas at Ravi Zacharias International Ministries in Atlanta, Georgia.

Charles Stanley – Through Times of Trial

 Genesis 39:19-23

When the problems of life seem overwhelming, we need someone to come alongside and help us to see our difficulties through the eyes of our sovereign God. Joseph is just such a person. Although he lived thousands of years ago, his story still speaks to us with great insight into the Lord’s purposes.

Joseph experienced a wide variety of trials—hatred, rejection, and betrayal by his brothers; loss of home, family, and freedom; false accusation and imprisonment; and the loneliness and disappointment of being forgotten. His life was a series of difficult and unfair situations, yet Scripture never records any bitterness or revenge in Joseph’s responses to all these circumstances.

Though outwardly it may have seemed as if God had abandoned the young man, He was doing some awesome work in Joseph’s heart. The Lord had big plans for him, and He knew that these trials would be the most effective tools in preparing His servant for the work that lay ahead.

As Joseph responded to each situation with faith in God and diligence in every task assigned to him, one fact became obvious to all who knew him: The Lord was with Joseph (Gen. 39:2, 21, 23).

We need to remember this when we are going through hard times: The Lord is with us even when our circumstances seem to shout that He has deserted us. We may have little control over the difficulties we face, but we each have a choice of how to respond. Joseph calls to us from out of the past, urging us to trust God.

Our Daily Bread – Whose Will?

 

 

“O My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as You will.” —Matthew 26:39

Read: Genesis 39:1-6, 20-23
Bible in a Year: Leviticus 25; Mark 1:23-45

“May all things happen according to your will,” is a greeting frequently exchanged during Chinese New Year. As wonderful as that may sound, events turn out best when God’s will plays out and not mine.

Given a choice, Joseph would not have wished to be a slave in Egypt (Gen. 39:1). But despite his captivity, he was “successful” because “the Lord was with [him]” (v.2). The Lord even blessed his master’s home “for Joseph’s sake” (v.5).

Joseph would never have chosen to go to prison in Egypt. But he did when falsely accused of sexual assault. However, for the second time we read: “the Lord was with Joseph” (v.21). There, he gained the trust of the warden (v.22) so that “whatever he did, the Lord made it prosper” (v.23). His downward spiral into prison turned out to be the start of his rise to the top position in Egypt. Few people would choose to be promoted the way God promoted Joseph. But Joseph’s God blesses, despite, and even through, adverse circumstances.

God had a purpose for bringing Joseph to Egypt, and He has a purpose for placing us where we are. Instead of wishing that all things happened according to our will, we could say, as our Savior did before going to the cross, “Not as I will, but as You will” (Matt. 26:39).—C. P. Hia

Lord, it is far too easy to chase my own desires and passions. Forgive me for my selfish wants and pursuit of self-centered activities. Help me to place You first and to look for what You are doing and want to do in my life.

Patient waiting is often the highest way of doing God’s will.

Max Lucado – Searching the Night for a Light

 

On the night when Jesus was born, I wonder if Joseph prayed, “Father, this all seems so bizarre. The angel you sent? Any chance you could send another?” You’ve stood where Joseph stood. Each of us knows what it’s like to search the night for a light. Not outside a stable, but perhaps outside an emergency room or on the manicured grass of a cemetery. We’ve asked our questions. We have wondered why God does what he does.

If you’re asking what Joseph asked, let me urge you to do what Joseph did. Obey. He didn’t let his confusion disrupt his obedience. What about you? You have a choice: to obey or disobey. Because Joseph obeyed, God used him to change the world. Can He do the same with you? Will you be that kind of person? Will you serve. . .even when you don’t understand?

From In the Manger

Max Lucado – Out on a Limb

 

After His mother Mary was betrothed to Joseph, before they came together, she was found with child of the Holy Spirit (Mt. 1:18 NKJV). Joseph was perched firmly on his branch in the tree. Predictable and solid, Joseph had no intention of leaving it. That is, until he was told to go out on a limb.

“Conceived by the Holy Spirit? Come on! Who will believe me?”

Pride told him not to do it. But God told him to do it. I have a feeling you can relate to Joseph. One foot in your will and one foot in His. His will or yours? Disrupting, isn’t it? You can bet it won’t be easy. Limb-climbing has never been. Ask Joseph…or better yet, ask Jesus! He knows better than anyone the cost of hanging on a tree!

From In the Manger

John MacArthur –Defeating Death

John MacArthur

“By faith Isaac blessed Jacob and Esau, even regarding things to come. By faith Jacob, as he was dying, blessed each of the sons of Joseph, and worshiped, leaning on the top of his staff. By faith Joseph, when he was dying, made mention of the exodus of the sons of Israel, and gave orders concerning his bones” (Heb. 11:20-22).

Faith triumphs over death.

Commentator Matthew Henry said, “Though the grace of faith is of universal use throughout the Christian’s life, yet it is especially so when we come to die. Faith has its great work to do at the very last, to help believers to finish well, to die to the Lord so as to honor Him, by patience, hope and joy so as to leave a witness behind them of the truth of God’s Word and the excellency of His ways.”

God is honored when His people die triumphantly. When we’ve lived a life to His glory, and joyfully left the world behind to enter into His presence for all eternity, He is pleased, for “precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His godly ones” (Ps. 116:15).

Many believers who have dreaded facing death have experienced a special measure of God’s grace that made their final hours the sweetest and most precious of their lives.

Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph are examples of men who faced death with great faith and confidence. Each “died in faith, without receiving the promises, but having seen them and having welcomed them from a distance, and having confessed that they were strangers and exiles on the earth” (Heb. 11:13). They hadn’t seen all God’s promises fulfilled, but by faith they passed them on to their children.

These men didn’t have perfect faith. Joseph was exemplary, but Isaac and Jacob often vacillated in their walk with God. Yet each ended his life triumphantly. That’s the reward of all who trust God and cling to His promises.

Like every believer before you, you haven’t seen the fulfillment of all God’s promises. But certainly you’ve seen far more than Isaac, Jacob, or Joseph did. How much more then should you trust God and encourage those who follow you to do the same?

Suggestions for Prayer; Thank God for His marvelous grace, which triumphs over sin and death.

For Further Study; Read the final words of Jacob and Joseph in Genesis 48:1—49:33 and 50:22-26.

 

 

Presidential Prayer Team; C.H. – Flight by Night

ppt_seal01

The Wise Men had just departed, leaving gold, frankincense and myrrh. Mary, Joseph and young Jesus must have been in awe of the scholars who followed the star and appeared at their door. The gifts alone were worth more than Joseph had probably ever seen in one place.

And he rose and took the child and his mother by night and departed to Egypt.

Matthew 2:14

But that night as they slept, an angel awakened Joseph, telling him to go to Egypt. Egypt – the land where his forefathers had spent so many years in captivity. The Bible doesn’t tell how Joseph packed the next morning and left, or even how he questioned the angel. Today’s verse simply states his response. Joseph got up from his bed, took Mary and Jesus, and left that night. The man chosen to be Christ’s earthly father exhibited the characteristic of immediate obedience.

When was the last time God spoke to you and you obeyed without question? Not many can claim such a feat. But that’s what your Heavenly Father longs to see in your life. Ask God to create a desire in you to follow His lead in an instant. Then pray the president and his cabinet would be able to hear and follow Him as well.

Recommended Reading: Matthew 2:13-23  Click to Read or Listen

Charles Stanley – In the Midst of Trials

Charles Stanley

Genesis 39:6-20

Joseph’s enslavement lasted for 13 years and went from bad to worse. He lost his favored position in Potiphar’s household and went to prison when the master’s wife told lies about him. His hope for release from jail died when the king’s servant forgot his promise (Gen. 40:14, 23). The future looked bleak.

Despite the evidence of circumstances, God was carrying out His plan to bless Joseph and benefit his family. Joseph was His appointed person to rescue them from the coming famine. To accomplish this, he had to learn the Egyptian language and culture, develop leadership abilities, and mature spiritually. The Lord’s plan accomplished all of this.

Joseph learned two helpful lessons. First, the Lord is a faithful companion who uses our troubles to prepare us for His work. When the time came, Joseph was fully trained to become second-in-command to Pharaoh—the Egyptian king even testified that God’s presence was with Joseph (41:38).

Second, when the Lord accomplishes His purposes, the difficulty will end. At God’s chosen moment, Joseph was freed from jail, rewarded with a high-ranking appointment, and reconciled with his family. Though his boyhood was gone, he was greatly blessed by living in the center of the Father’s will.

Adversity can be painful, but the Lord uses it to further His purposes and equip us for His plan. What is He trying to teach you in the midst of your trials? Are you cooperating with Him? Remember, even Jesus suffered in order to fulfill God’s redemptive purpose (Matt. 16:21).

Our Daily Bread — All Kinds Of Help

Our Daily Bread

Genesis 41:46-57

Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Inasmuch as God has shown you all this, there is no one as discerning and wise as you.” —Genesis 41:39

In the wake of the shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, many people have felt strongly compelled to help. Some donated blood for the injured, some provided free lunches and coffee at their restaurants for workers. Others wrote letters of comfort or just gave hugs. Some sent gifts of money and teddy bears for the children; others offered counseling. People found ways to serve according to their personalities, abilities, and resources.

A story in the Bible about Joseph tells how he used his skills to play an important role in helping people survive a 7-year famine (Gen. 41:53-54). In his case, he could prepare beforehand because he knew a difficult time was coming. After Joseph warned Pharaoh, the king of Egypt, that the lean years were coming, Pharaoh put him in charge of the 7-year preparation time. Joseph used wisdom and discernment from God to get his country ready (41:39). Then, when “the famine was over all the face of the earth, . . . Joseph opened all the storehouses” (v.56). He was even able to help his own family (45:16-18).

These stories show the heart of God for the world. He has prepared us and made us who we are that we might care for others in whatever way He leads us. —Anne Cetas

Lord, help me feel the hurt that others feel

When life inflicts some bitter pain,

And use me in some loving way to heal

The wounds that may through life remain. —D. DeHaan

Compassion offers whatever is necessary to heal.

Bible in a year: 2 Samuel 1-2; Luke 14:1-24

Insight

Although Joseph suffered many injustices, God ultimately used him to help others by empowering him to provide food for those who otherwise would have starved. This principle applies to the believer even today. God can help us persevere in our suffering so that we can help others who are in need in the future. In the New Testament, Paul tells us that we experience pain and God’s comfort in order to comfort others (2 Cor. 1:3-4).

Charles Stanley – A Faith-Filled Outlook

Charles Stanley

Genesis 39:21-40:8

If anyone had reason to be discouraged, Joseph did. His mother died when he was a boy. His brothers hated him, sold him into slavery, and convinced his father that he was dead. Joseph worked hard in Potiphar’s household but ended up in prison because of false allegations. Yet he was not an angry person.

The Hebrew slave maintained his faith- filled outlook because he consistently relied upon God, who was always with him. Even in prison, Joseph was given responsibility over others (vv. 21-22). Like that righteous young man, we might also be “held captive”—by unemployment, ill health, or a difficult relationship. In those hard places, we can nevertheless experience our Father’s presence and thrive: His Holy Spirit will produce godly fruit in us when we depend upon Him (Gal. 5:22-23).

Whatever his circumstances were, Joseph refused to focus on himself. When two royal servants were jailed, he had compassion for them and gave them aid. In times of both blessing and crisis, we are to help others in any way we can (2 Cor. 1:3-4). And notice, too, how Joseph didn’t shrink back from speaking boldly about God to these men and to Pharaoh. He told the Egyptian leader that the answer he sought regarding his dreams would come from the Lord (Gen. 41:16).

Whether enslaved, imprisoned, or serving as Pharaoh’s second-in-command, Joseph flourished. He endured much hardship but saw that the Lord had used it for good (Gen. 50:19-20). Because the Holy Spirit’s presence is within us, we—like Joseph—can have a faith-filled perspective that glorifies God.

Greg Laurie – Joseph, the Unsung Hero

greglaurie

Now in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent by God to a city of Galilee named Nazareth, to a virgin betrothed to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David. The virgin’s name was Mary. —Luke 1:26–27

To me, Joseph is the unsung hero of the Christmas story. Very little is said about him, but he was a righteous man.

Luke’s Gospel tells us that Mary was “betrothed to a man whose name was Joseph” (1:27). This arrangement was a little different than engagements of today. According to the rabbinical writings, there were two stages in a Hebrew marriage. The first, known as the betrothal period, was as legally binding as marriage. If at any time during this phase of marriage either person violated their vows, a formal divorce was required to nullify the marriage. Mary and Joseph were legally married, and during the approximate twelve-month period of their betrothal, they had no physical relationship and lived in separate houses. The second stage was the wedding ceremony, which lasted for seven days.

It was in the first stage of their betrothal that Mary became pregnant with the Son of God. Joseph could have divorced her because of this. His heart must have been broken, but he didn’t want to make a spectacle out of Mary. Then the angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take to you Mary your wife, for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 1:20).

Joseph knew that he would be thought of as the husband of the woman who had broken her vow. And indeed Mary went through life with that reputation. The Pharisees once said to Jesus, “We were not born of fornication; we have one Father—God” (John 8:41). In other words, “You were conceived out of wedlock, Jesus.”

Joseph was willing to endure all of that. He loved Mary. He obeyed God. And both of them agreed to God’s plan.

Greg Laurie – The “Unsung Hero” of the Christmas Story

greglaurie

When you set up your nativity set for the Christmas season, one of the figures that is often not noticed, or is put off to one side, is Joseph.

Joseph is not featured in many Christmas songs either. But I believe that Joseph, in many ways, is the unsung hero of the Christmas story. Just as surely as God chose Mary to be the mother of the Messiah, He also chose Joseph. God the Father in heaven chose Joseph to be a stepfather, or father figure on earth, for Jesus!

The angel of the Lord came to Mary and revealed that the Messiah of Israel would be supernaturally conceived in her womb. Hearing Mary was pregnant, Joseph was willing to simply put her away quietly and break the engagement. He did not seem to be buying the whole “supernatural conception” idea. At least he was struggling with it, pondering a life without his dear Mary. But the Angel of the Lord came to him too.

“But while he thought about these things, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream, saying, ‘Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take to you Mary your wife, for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit. And she will bring forth a Son, and you shall call His name Jesus, for He will save His people from their sins'” (Matthew 1:20-21).

Joseph could have walked away if he wanted. But to his credit, he stood by Mary and Jesus and, despite the shame, loved that Boy. Mary went through life with a “scarlet A” on her, in the eyes of many. And Joseph went through life being thought of as a man married to a promiscuous woman.

The irony of this is Mary was an extraordinarily virtuous and godly woman. On one occasion, the Pharisees said to Jesus, “At least we weren’t born of fornication!” (John 8:41). The implication of that statement is that Jesus was conceived out of wedlock.

But Mary bore this along with the death of her son on the cross. No, she was not perfect or sinless, nor should we pray to her or through her. But she was faithful to what God asked her to do.

And so was Joseph. He was chosen by God to be the stepfather of God in human form.

 

 

John MacArthur – Defeating Death

John MacArthur

“By faith Isaac blessed Jacob and Esau, even regarding things to come. By faith Jacob, as he was dying, blessed each of the sons of Joseph, and worshiped, leaning on the top of his staff. By faith Joseph, when he was dying, made mention of the exodus of the sons of Israel, and gave orders concerning his bones” (Heb. 11:20-22).

Commentator Matthew Henry said, “Though the grace of faith is of universal use throughout the Christian’s life, yet it is especially so when we come to die. Faith has its great work to do at the very last, to help believers to finish well, to die to the Lord so as to honor Him, by patience, hope and joy so as to leave a witness behind them of the truth of God’s Word and the excellency of His ways.”

God is honored when His people die triumphantly. When we’ve lived a life to His glory, and joyfully left the world behind to enter into His presence for all eternity, He is pleased, for “precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His godly ones” (Ps. 116:15).

Many believers who have dreaded facing death have experienced a special measure of God’s grace that made their final hours the sweetest and most precious of their lives.

Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph are examples of men who faced death with great faith and confidence. Each “died in faith, without receiving the promises, but having seen them and having welcomed them from a distance, and having confessed that they were strangers and exiles on the earth” (Heb. 11:13). They hadn’t seen all God’s promises fulfilled, but by faith they passed them on to their children.

These men didn’t have perfect faith. Joseph was exemplary, but Isaac and Jacob often vacillated in their walk with God. Yet each ended his life triumphantly. That’s the reward of all who trust God and cling to His promises.

Like every believer before you, you haven’t seen the fulfillment of all God’s promises. But certainly you’ve seen far more than Isaac, Jacob, or Joseph did. How much more then should you trust God and encourage those who follow you to do the same?

Suggestions for Prayer:

Thank God for His marvelous grace, which triumphs over sin and death.

For Further Study:

Read the final words of Jacob and Joseph in Genesis 48:1–49:33 and 50:22-26.